To Share or not To Share that is the Question

Due to TBLI Group’s unique network, we are often asked to “meet for coffee, catch up, share ideas, compare notes, etc”. This is code for I need to pick your brain to develop a strategy, find clients, find investors, find staff, find a job, or repackage my deck to get business. We were always happy to help educate others as this would ultimately create the inclusive values economy. That is our mission. Lately, I have been rethinking this. As more and more consultants, asset owners, fund managers and govt. agencies were contacting us, I started to look at what drives all of them. ROI (Return on Investment).

When I look at the ROI of what TBLI has done to build the community of ESG and Impact Investors, the industry has benefitted and the ROI is a big plus. My next question was has TBLI benefitted? What has been the ROI for TBLI? Have all these individuals who we have connected with strategic partners, investors, clients put something back. The jury is still out on that. Many have not.

Going forward should we not share? Should we not meet for the data dump, unless we are compensated? Should there be a clear donation to foundation, consulting jobs, sponsorship, conference attendance before assisting others.  Many have been extremely generous to TBLI and others working on an economy based upon well being.  How can one create a filter for those that feel by not sharing and closing their arms to have more will give them a leg up on others? I have often long conversations with other colleagues who’s work benefits the commons more than themselves. They all struggle on monetising their relationships.  I would be curious how you deal with this?

Not sharing would not be beneficial to us all. In the end, I am always amazed by the generosity of people, so I think this issue will resolve itself. People do surprise you. Even your teen age boys ultimately clean their room.

Let’s connect again at TBLI

For many of you, it has been a while since we last communicated. or some we still haven’t met or spoken. We traveled the world with our event this year and I’m happy to tell you we’ll be back in Zurich on Nov. 19-20 for TBLI CONFERENCE EUROPE 2015.

Let’s connect again or for the first time! Don’t forget to register

TBLI News

I am quite honoured to have been asked to join the advisory board of Lifestyles Magazine. Lifestyles Magazine is a 44 year old subscription only publication for high philanthropy. Looking forward to help them expand their content around Impact Investing.

IE Business School’s Net Impact Chapter will hold its 10th Annual Social Responsibility Forum in Madrid, Spain.  I have been asked to give the keynote speech at IE Forum November 27-28. Looking forward to meeting the MBA’s who want to embrace a values based financial system.

TBLI Social Entrepreneur

A very dear friend of mine, Khun Thippaporn Chearavanont has been very active as social entrepreneur in community development and real estate. She has been doing amazing projects taking the Green Building concept to new heights, by integrating health in her projects. Her company MQDC (Magnolia Quality Development Corporation) part of the DT Group  is very innovative in that they have been developing low carbon properties, where health is integral part of the experience. Congratulations.

Whizdom 101 is her latest project

Awesome

I looked up the definition of a commonly used word. Awesome: extremely impressive or daunting; inspiring awe: the awesome power of the atomic bomb. In the informal extremely good; excellent: the band is truly awesome! Why then is everything awesome? “I will call you back later”. “Awesome”. “See you next week.” “Awesome”. “I am going for a run”. “Awesome”. Why don’t we start being a bit discerning in what is awesome and what is just “fine”.

Cap and Share

TBLI has been working for its entire history on scaling up zero-low carbon investments. The solution always seemed very clear, carbon has to be a cost but no one wants to pay for it. In addition, the consumer was not included in most of the discussion around cap and trade.

Why don’t we go to a cap and share and give everyone an equal carbon allowance? If you are carbon efficient, take public transport or the bike, you can earn credits. If you can’t live without your ferrari, you buy credits. This way consumers can earn money by reducing carbon emissions. With everything being captured by big data, public transport chip cards, green credit cards and other new sources, it is doable.

That is what I call Awesome.

That’s what we’re missing. We’re missing argument. We’re missing debate. We’re missing colloquy. We’re missing all sorts of things. Instead, we’re accepting.

Studs Terkel

TBLI CONFERENCE EUROPE will be held on Nov. 19-20 in Zurich. Come and meet truly AWESOME people doing AWESOME things.

Support TBLI Foundation

 

Trust and Consequences

The daughter of a friend of mine called me about a Dutch Fraud Film festival. Would I have any examples of fraud to apply for the Fraud Film Festival Prize? The winner would receive funding to produce a documentary. I replied. “Wow. There is no shortage of examples”. Leonard Blankfein’s (Goldman Sachs CEO) Senate Hearings testimony came to mind.

If you look at this clip, it is quite amazing to see how Blankfein defends Goldman’s actions in a very circular reasoning that gets the viewer so confused that one loses the script. The basic question that Senator Levin asked was quite simple. “Is there not a conflict when you sell something to someone and then are determined to bet against that security and don’t disclose that to your client?”

Blankfein’s answer is stunning.

“Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.”
Albert Einstein
I look forward to greeting you at TBLI CONFERENCE EUROPE 2015 in Zurich November 19-20 and introducing you to people of integrity and trust.

TBLI Testimonial

“TBLI is not just a great place to increase one’s understanding about sustainable investing it is also an excellent place to meet and network; some of the contacts I have made at TBLI have turned into successful and lucrative business partnerships.”

Rufo Quintavalle-Poet, Investor and Director at Agro-Ecological Investment Management

Guest Blog: Rufo Quintavalle

Tracking errors are themselves an error

An article earlier this year in Institutional Investor pointed to low carbon indexes as an alternative to fossil fuel divestment for investors who are concerned about climate change. Citing the example of the Swedish pension fund, AP4, and the French pension fund, FRR, who both use this investment strategy the article describes these funds as “low-carbon equity indexes that closely track blue-chip benchmarks while excluding most carbon-exposed companies in those benchmarks.” Which, translated into terms that people outside of the financial sector can understand, means “a way to say you are doing something about climate change while not actually doing it”.
It is probably already too late to stop global warming of 2?C, although that remains the official goal that negotiators at the COP21 will be working towards. But what is certain is that if there is to be any hope at all of avoiding catastrophic climate change then the world economy will have to fundamentally alter. In such a context any strategy that proposes closely tracking “blue-chip benchmarks” is woefully inadequate since the “blue-chip benchmarks” simply reflect the reality of the world economy as it is and not as it should be.
Proponents of low carbon indexes would say that by excluding the most polluting companies they can contribute to an incremental change towards a low carbon future – companies will be pressurized to improve their performance in order to make it onto the index and a virtuous circle will be set in place. But in the same way that you cannot have your cake and eat it you cannot have an investment strategy that purports to address climate change while only accepting a tiny tracking error relative to the broader economy. The broader economy is itself part of the problem and if we do want to address climate change then what is needed is as large a tracking error as possible. Otherwise we will end up with low carbon indexes that by their own internal logic are obliged to invest in companies such as Royal Dutch Shell (the fourth largest holding of MSCI’s European Low Carbon Leaders Index) and Exxon Mobil (the third largest holding of the equivalent global fund).
The inadequacy of low carbon indexes to address climate change is, to be fair, not an indictment of institutions like AP4 and FRR who are, compared to their peers, among the more progressive of institutional investors. Rather it is an indictment of our financial system as a whole which, as it is structured will never be able to address climate change or indeed any other problem that is time-sensitive and requires systemic change. And ultimately this failure boils down to a philosphical failure regarding moral agency and the true nature of investment. If the goal of investing is simply to mimic the behavior of the broader financial market then the money managers and the people devising the indexes are doing a good job (although one suspects it is the kind of job that could be done just as easily by a computer). But if we are to understand investment as something that does not simply follow the markets but rather seeks to actively create value for society then our financial system is conspicuously failing.
So what to do in a context where the system as a whole is inadequate to serve society? And in which every single one of us is complicit in this problem the minute we take out an insurance policy or start paying into a pension plan? To those with no disposable income at all the most obvious course of action is to lobby your pension fund and your insurer to adopt a genuinely proactive policy on climate change and divest from fossil fuels. For those who do have disposable income to invest and are interested in using their investment dollars to combat climate change then you could consider investing this money outside the stock markets via angel investing, crowdfunding, private equity and other asset classes that your banker will do his or her best not to tell you about. The rewards here are far greater both financially but also in terms of accelerating the transition to a clean, green economy. And finally, since it is all too easy to point the finger at others we ought to examine our own collective responsibility in creating a state of affairs where “investment” has reduced itself to the buying and selling of shares in publicly listed multinationals who never needed our money in the first place.
Bernie Madoff was able to thrive as long as he did because there was a stream of people who liked the idea of a steady “no-risk” annual return of 10%. But ultimately if you are getting returns without risk that means someone else is picking up the bill. In the case of Madoff it was the new subscribers who were picking up the bill for the old ones. In the case of the broader financial system (of which low carbon indexes are merely a symptom) it is the planet as a whole which is picking up the bill for our obsession with “low-risk” listed equities and our refusal to rock the boat.

 

Empty Gestures

I am a huge fan of the tv show Curb Your Enthusiasm. The star and writer, Larry David, is brilliant in his ability to be brutally honest, awkward,  and totally embarrassing with his social dysfunctionality. However, the show makes you laugh, which is essential, these days.  If you never watched it, start today. Every time I am watching a television interview or listening to a podcast interview about something that I find important, I think of Larry David.

Most people being interviewed always say “that is a very good question” even if the question is stupid, useless, empty or just a dead end. What drives me crazy is the standard  one-two punch in responding to the interviewer. First “that is a very good question” then you hear “You know. It is very interesting…”, even if nothing is interesting, which they often prove with their answer. I often think that media advisors or other “experts” on not being authentic, train people with these two repetitive statements. Larry David’s does a brilliant parody on these empty comments.

Let’s  have a real dialogue where people say what they really think and challenge the interviewer in a polite, educational, and engaging way. Empty gestures don’t cut it and just dumbs us down. The stakes are too high and we need to be inspirational, thought provoking and laugh.

A genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Come to TBLI EUROPE 2015, Nov. 19-20 in Zurich. You will  be inspired and have your thoughts challenged, and have a great time.

Guest Post Jochen Wermuth

The first Dow Jones Industrial Index only had steam engine rail companies in it, there were only horses on the roads and horse-whip-makers were great investments. Just a few years later there were no more horses on the road, no rail company in the Dow Jones – a new industrial revolution based on the combustion engine wiped out the old economy companies, with many losers and winners like the Rockefellers and JP Morgans at the time. A similar new industrial revolution is under way now with similarly large risks and opportunities.
With solar power being offered at $4cent/kWh in Austin Texas, a price with which oil could only compete at $7/barrel, the fossil fuel economy is dead. There will be huge changes in the world economy with many losers (the old oil, gas, coal companies and their related industries ) and many winners, the new Rockefellers. We  can stand at the spearhead of this new industrial revolution, allowing us to earn outstanding profits and at the same time generating a sustainable future for our planet.
On the risk side, there will have to be write-offs of $21 trillion in oil, gas and coal reserves by listed companies, as they will no longer be profitable to burn because greater energy efficiency and competition from renewables will drive down long-term fossil fuel prices. This is huge and compares to $15 trillion write-offs in the mortgage bubble.
On the opportunity side, emerging markets still consume 4x as much energy as we do say in Germany or in the EU. Thus bringing state-of-art products there we can make a lot of money and have a huge impact. With solar and wind-power now costing less than power from the grid there are also ample business opportunities across the world. Few have realized this, just as few realized for a long time that smoking was bad for your health…
Great background reading in this regard is the book “My indecent proposal to the German Chancellor” which tells the great success story of a farmer’s boy becoming the owner-manager of a multibillion dollar company in the renewable energy space and sets out the plan for Germany to become 100% renewable powered by 2020. A model for a successful business leader in the new industrial revolution, winning against all odds, and a model for any country in the world (in particular those with more sun) to follow.
As missing this opportunity may not only cost each of us money but could destroy life on our plante, my wife Sasha and I have shared with many of you a hard-copy of the book already. Given continued interest we have gotten the author to make the book available electronically and free of charge for TBLI Blog readers in return for my father having edited and translated it to English.
To download your complimentary copy of the Book in different “eBook” formats for almost any common reading device like Kindle, Tablets ( IOS Android ) or Smartphones, please visit There is also a pdf version for PC-, Mac and Linux Users available. If everything else fails, you can also find an adobe flash based ePaper Version that you can read online with any flash enabled Browser. If you have Problems downloading or opening your copy, please contact helmut.zengerling@wermutham.com.
Please have a look and enjoy!

Jochen Wermuth
Founding Partner and CIO
Wermuth Asset Management GmbH
www.wermutham.com
jwermuth@wermutham.com