Renewable Plastic

By now you’ve run into some of the media coverage concerning potentially toxic plastics used for items such as water bottles. Particular concern was sparked in Canada, where the ministry of health even went as far as to ban certain bottles from being sold in the country.

As someone who drinks plenty of water from the tap, transported often via my nalgene bottle, this left me particularly concerned. Aspects like the age of my bottle, type of plastic used, and other details, have all become subject of extensive research and reflection; what is this thing I drink my water from?

So then at the Brooklyn Bridge office I get word about a renewable plastic company. Renewable plastic, the term itself sparks plenty of interest. I picture a non toxic, planet friendly plastic, both from how it is created, to when I make use of it, to after I’ve disposed of it… that is what I would hope for.

The company’s name is Cereplast. An initial look at how they describe their products is already encouraging,

All Cereplast resins replace a significant percentage of petroleum-based additives with starches made out of corn, wheat, tapioca and potatoes.

Exciting to anyone who doubts the ease with which such plastic could be produced, Celeplast says that their products can be made using conventional manufacturing equipment. When you add to that the fact that most, if not all, national governments as well as at the European Union level, are passing laws that will require health and environmental related reforms in the manufacturing and use of plastics, seems like Cereplast is exactly what I’d like my waterbottle to be made of.

To finish off the post for today, I recommend this list of documents released by the Biodegradable Products Institute in NYC. I think the plastic bottle of my dreams will be listed in there somewhere.

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